Mark S. Weiner

ROC discussed i svenska i na hrvatskom jeziku

In Rule of the Clan on November 22, 2014 at 4:08 pm

I’m very pleased that The Rule of the Clan was the subject of two reviews in languages other than English this week. One review, in the Swedish magazine Axess, is by the writer, journalist, and filmmaker Bengt G. Nilsson, who calls the book “a powerful plea for the strong state governed by liberal principles.”

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The second review is by Zvonimir Šikić, professor of mathematics at the University of Zagreb, Croatia, and appears in Banka.hr. Šikić writes that “libertarians, who regularly assert that the opposition between individual autonomy and the state is insurmountable, especially should consider the modern paradox of individualism, which Weiner excellently explains and documents.”

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And thus the world grows smaller …

 

Edward Coke, Meet Humphrey Bogart

In Aesthetics, Books and libraries, form, Law and film, Law and music, narrative on November 16, 2014 at 10:17 pm

My latest video is about rare books, jazz, the passage of time, and old movies … and the law reports of the great jurist Edward Coke:

If you have trouble streaming the video, it may be because it’s in 1080p format. You can deselect “HD” in the menu bar at the bottom right of the frame and watch the video in standard definition, or you can watch it in multiple formats on my YouTube channel, here (select the settings tab on the lower-right corner of the frame—that’s the wheel icon, the third icon from the right).

Save the Date: February 2018

In Aesthetics, Books and libraries on September 15, 2014 at 6:39 pm

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OK, so it’s a long way off, but I hope you’ll mark your calendars for three years hence. That’s when an exhibition I’ll be co-curating with Mike Widener of the Yale Law Library is set to open at the Grollier Club in Manhattan. The club is “America’s oldest and largest society for bibliophiles and enthusiasts of the graphic arts.” Mike and I recently heard the good news that our proposal was accepted.

The exhibit is called “Law’s Picture Books: The Yale Law Library Collection.” Yes, it’s true: “law books” and “illustrations” are two things you don’t typically associate with each other. After all, law presents itself as based in the Word—as logocentric. And let’s face it: many law books are a visual snooze. Yet law’s application to the actual world of people and things generates a tandem, if often ignored, figurative impulse in legal books.

The exhibit will invite visitors to explore the incredible range of responses to this central tension at the heart of law as a social phenomenon—namely that law mediates between abstract rules and the material world, between ideals and the everyday—and it will do so by bringing together a fantastic array of beautifully illustrated books Mike has been collecting since 2006 as the law school’s rare book librarian.

See you there!

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