Mark S. Weiner

Posts Tagged ‘Horatio Alger’

A publisher, a library, a cemetery, a party

In Aesthetics, Aesthetics, narrative, form, Books and libraries, form, Gender, Law and film, Law and literature, Method, narrative, Video on September 13, 2014 at 8:38 am

In part three of “Walking with Horatio Alger,” I take a train ride to Philadelphia’s Chinatown, spend an afternoon in a lonely academic library, drive to a Massachusetts cemetery while listening to Fats Waller, and relax at a party with a bunch of fun-loving kids. How can video help bring a 1909 edition of Ragged Dick back into some of its original spatial and temporal relationships?

Here’s the complete video:

Small Blank Space

Here are links to individual sections: part one; part two; and—the latest—part three.

 

 

A Literary Ramble through New York

In Aesthetics, Aesthetics, narrative, form, Law and film, Law and literature, Video on March 31, 2014 at 12:03 pm

In Part II of “Walking with Horatio Alger,” I follow the path taken by Horatio Alger’s Ragged Dick on the first day of the novel. I’m accompanied by friend, former student, and lawyer Matt Milford, and we reflect on the story and its meaning while try to recapture its original sense of place. We also eat a delicious Vietnamese bánh mì sandwich.

Small Blank Space

For Part I of my Horatio Alger video series, see here.

September 13, 2014: This post has been moved to March 31, 2014 for organizational purposes.

Walking with Horatio Alger

In Aesthetics, Books and libraries, form, Gender, Law and literature, narrative, Video on March 30, 2014 at 7:48 pm

Horatio Alger doesn’t have much to do with law or legal history—except for the extraordinary fact that he was Justice Benjamin Cardozo’s private tutor for a spell. But I hope you’ll enjoy this video all the same. It’s about a wonderful old book I found a couple of weeks ago after a long hike.

Small Blank Space

The video is the first, draft installment in a series which, among other things, is giving me great practice in video editing in Adobe Premiere Pro—which, in turn, will allow me to create a long-planned series of videos that will tell the story of the development of the common law through the linked story of ten rare books.

September 13, 2014: This post has been moved to March 30, 2014 for organizational purposes.